LAWS WINDSHIELD REPLACEMENT

At one time or another it happens to all of us – cast a stone on the road and on the windshield, from a small crack that slowly cobweb out and spread across the glass panel, with time , you will need to replace your windshield. Apart from the obvious dangers of driving with a cracked windshield, you could get a ticket if it violates the laws in your state. Several US laws regulate safety conditions windshield and windshield replacement insurance.

Federal regulations established by the US Department of Transportation, describes the minimum requirements for the visibility of the windshield and that each state should enforce. These federal regulations state that, apart from legal tint, the center of the windscreen must be free of discoloration or damage this central area is defined as the space above the steering wheel, which extends two inches from the top of the windshield, and inch on each side. However, a single crack can legally extend in this space as long as it does not cross with any other cracks. This means that regardless of your state of residence, if you have a web crack in the center of your windshield, you’ll have to replace it.

Most state traffic laws extend beyond the minimum requirements established by the Department of Transportation of the USA.. Essentially, all the laws of windshield visibility state assert that the windshield damage can not harm vision driver. However, the definition of disability, in this case, often differs from state to state. In Wisconsin, for example, vehicles cannot have any crack in the critical zone, defined as the touch wipers clear that section, nor can the windshield cracks contain more than eight inches from the border or rock chips , shock, etc. more than 1 1/2 inches in diameter (1/2 inch in the critical area).

Some states have laws regulating how auto insurance companies can conduct business when it comes to windshield replacement, most laws regulating the use of windshield replacement or used, when your insurance covers replacement. Most states, including Oregon, Rhode Island, North Carolina and Georgia, allow auto insurance companies to reduce costs by using replacement windshield aftermarket. However, they must provide written notice of their intent to use a windshield replacement, and should be the same design and quality of a new one. Apart from the aftermarket parts, some states, like California, require your insurance company allow you to choose the repair shop of windscreen.